Per http://www.accident-claim-expert.co.uk, under British Fatal Accident Act 1976 “close relatives can claim a bereavement payment – the pain and suffering for the loss of a close family member. This is a fixed sum of money and is divided amongst those entitled to claim it. As from the beginning of 2009 the amount is £11 800. You are entitled to claim bereavement damages if you are the wife, husband or civil partner of the deceased. If the deceased was a minor (under the age of 18 years) – you can only claim if you are a parent of the deceased and if the deceased was an illegitimate child you can only claim if you are the mother.”

Likewise, http://www.camplaw.co.uk ran headlines in June 2009 as “£30,000 fine for company in tragic wall collapse death accident”.

Similarly, per http://www.levenes.co.uk, in November 2008 “Yorkshire construction firm Illson has been ordered to pay £6,800 after one of its workers sustained serious back injuries when he fell more than three metres from a terrace retaining wall on a construction site in Leeds” and that “A building contractor has been fined £7,000 after a worker broke his back when a wall fell on him at a construction site in east London.”

Furthermore, on February 22, 2011 in an incident similar to Nepal involving a government authority and its negligence to adequately inspect, repair and avoid personal as well as public injuries, http://www.the-claim-solicitors.co.uk made it public that “Parents, whose toddler was crushed to death when a brick wall collapsed in high winds, may now claim compensation from Camden Council in London since its negligence has been found responsible for the fatal personal injury.” It further states that, “The council-owned boundary wall around a housing estate was only half a brick wide and it had been built in the 1970s. Cracks were found in the structure in 1997 and repairs had been made, but these were not carried out correctly. The London Borough of Camden, last year, initially denied it had failed in its health and safety duties but changed its plea in October 2010 to guilty, although saying it had done all that was reasonably practical to ensure the safety of the wall. However, Judge Deborah Taylor found the council’s inspection systems were “wholly inadequate” and that it had been responsible for suitable repairs being completed. The council was fined a total of £72,000 and ordered to pay £65,000 prosecution costs for the offences. The victim’s parents, who may consult a no win no fee solicitor regarding a damages payment, praised the persistent work of Health and Safety Executive inspectors in establishing liability for the personal injury accident.”

As the Embassy of United Kingdom, falls under the similar category of a Government Council, this is a dismay, disregards to the rule of law, equity and equality by the founders of common law. It is clear that the British Government is trying to avoid further liabilities and disregard the customary compensatory tort laws, applicable to the diplomats under the International Law.

The government should immediately demand that a just compensation be made to the grieved families as a just bereavement payment in the similar amount as imposed on Camden Council in London in 2011.