Stanford Summer Fellows on Democracy and Development (Annual)

Application period closed on January 13, 2006 for 2006. Apply before January 2007 for 2007 Placement.

The Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) at the Stanford Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, California invites policy makers and activists from countries undergoing political, economic and social transitions to participate in its second annual summer fellows program on democracy, development, and the rule of law to be held July 31 – August 18, 2006 at Stanford University on its California campus.

This program offers a unique approach to studying the ways in which democratic institutions and institutions that foster economic development can be established and strengthened in varying country contexts. In contrast to other programs of democracy promotion that seek to transfer ready made models to countries in transition, the Stanford Summer Fellows on Democracy and Development program provides a comparative perspective on the evolution of established democratic practices as well as a conceptual background into issues of democracy and good governance. The curriculum draws on the combined expertise of Stanford scholars and practitioners in the fields of political science, economics, law, sociology, and business and emphasizes the links between theory and practice.

While traditional programs focus either on democratization, economic development, or the rule of law, the Stanford Summer Fellows on Democracy and Development program endeavors to locate the points of interaction among these areas. Ideas and learning flow two ways. Participants are exposed to the knowledge of Stanford faculty and, in turn, they bring their country and professional experiences into the seminars to help faculty and one another develop case-specific methodologies for addressing actual problems of democratic and economic development.

In 2005, the program’s inaugural year, 32 policy-makers from 28 countries participated as Fellows. Each week, instructors and fellows focused on a different theme – democracy, development, and rule of law, respectively – and studied the policy implications of the interrelations between the workings of political, economic, and legal institutions in theory and practice. Discussions were led by Stanford faculty and scholars at the forefront of research at the junction of democratic advancement, economic growth, and issues surrounding the establishment of rule of law and human rights. Prominent leaders of research and development institutions and social movements, such as the National Endowment for Democracy, enhanced the weekly agenda. The daily seminars were complemented with field trips to local government institutions, NGOs, and business organizations.

Participants: Eligibility Criteria
This program is aimed at early to mid-career policy-makers, academics, and leaders of civil society organizations (such as representatives of trade unions, non-governmental organizations, the media, business and professional associations) who will play important roles in their country’s democratic, economic, and social development. We anticipate recruiting a group of 25-30 individuals dedicated to democracy and development promotion within their home countries (particularly in, but not limited to, the regions of the Middle East, Northern and Sub-Saharan Africa, Central Asia, and other parts of the former Soviet Union).

Successful applicants will be proficient in spoken and written English and will have academic and practical credentials necessary to benefit fully from the course and actively contribute to programmatic discussions. The ideal course participant will have extraordinary motivation, at least three to five years of experience in a relevant field of democratic development, and a keen interest in learning and sharing knowledge and experiences in transforming their respective countries.

CDDRL hopes that over time the participants in this annual program will form the core of a global network of public intellectuals and activists who are working on issues of democracy, development, and the rule of law.

Funding
Stanford will pay travel, accommodation, living expenses, and visa costs for the duration of the three-week program for a certain portion of applicants. Where possible, applicants are encouraged to supply some or all of their own funding from their current employers, international non-governmental organizations, etc.

Application procedures
Contact ANLUS for details. In addition, you must provide at least two but no more than three letters of recommendation from people who know you in your capacity of a development worker.